Weill Cornell Newsroom > Press Releases: 2013

Press Releases: 2013

December 19, 2013 - Dr. Rainu Kaushal Named Chair of New Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical College
Dr. Rainu Kaushal, an expert in health care quality, patient safety and information technology, has been named chair of the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical College and physician-in-chief of healthcare policy and research at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Formerly known as the Department of Public Health, the refocused Department of Healthcare Policy and Research will analyze health care delivery and find innovative ways to optimize the value and quality of health care for patients in New York and across the country.

December 11, 2013 - Half of Psychiatrists Reject Private and Federal Insurance, Preferring Cash
Access to mental health care has become a prominent issue in Congress following mass shootings around the country. But a new study in JAMA Psychiatry, led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College, suggests that unless those in need of help have deep pockets, they might have a hard time finding a psychiatrist that will provide the needed services.

December 05, 2013 - Accomplished Scientist and Entrepreneur Selected to Lead Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute
Michael A. Foley, PhD, has been selected to lead the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc. (Tri-I TDI), a pioneering collaboration of Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center that is designed to expedite early-stage drug discovery into novel treatments for patients.

December 03, 2013 - Protein in Prostate Biopsies Signals Increased Cancer Risk
Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have shown that the presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ. The discovery will likely help physicians decide how closely to monitor men potentially at risk for the cancer -- among the most confusing and controversial dilemmas in health care.

November 25, 2013 - "Rare" ApoE Gene Variant Now Believed to be Common in Africans and African Descendants Worldwide
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have found that a genetic variation that is linked to increased levels of triglycerides -- fats in the blood associated with disorders such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and stroke -- is far more common than previously believed and disproportionally affects people of African ancestry.

November 19, 2013 - Researchers Discover Idling Brain Activity in Severely Brain Injured Patients Who "Wake Up" After Using a Sleep Drug
A team of scientists led by Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered a signature of brain activity in three patients who were "awakened" from their minimally conscious state by the sleep aid drug Ambien.

November 18, 2013 - MasterCard Announces Grant to Weill Cornell Medical College
MasterCard today announced a $500,000 grant to Weill Cornell Medical College to support research efforts designed to end women's cancers.

November 12, 2013 - Detecting and Treating Silent Heart Disease: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College Launch New Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging
To help reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, the nation's leading killer, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College have created the Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging. Raymond T. Dalio, a life trustee of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, has made a gift of $20 million through his Dalio Foundation in support of the institute.

November 07, 2013 - Hope Builds for a Drug that Might Shut Down a Variety of Cancers
The most frequently mutated gene across all types of cancers is a gene called p53. Unfortunately it has been difficult to directly target this gene with drugs. Now a multi-institutional research team, led by Dr. Lewis Cantley and investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College, has identified a family of enzymes they say is crucial for the growth of cancers that have genetic aberrations in p53. Targeting these enzymes with novel agents might prevent the growth of p53 mutant cancers, thereby benefiting a broad spectrum of cancer patients, including those with breast, ovarian, lung, colorectal and brain tumors.

November 06, 2013 - With $3 Million Gift, Fashion Designer Michael Kors Establishes Endowed Immunology Professorship at Weill Cornell Medical College
Award-winning fashion designer Michael Kors has dedicated his career to designing luxury American sportswear. Now, with a $3 million gift to Weill Cornell Medical College, one of America's most recognized faces in fashion is seeking to significantly help advance human health.

October 31, 2013 - Scientists Capture Most Detailed Picture Yet of Key AIDS Protein
Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Weill Cornell Medical College have determined the first atomic-level structure of the tripartite HIV envelope protein -- long considered one of the most difficult targets in structural biology and of great value for medical science.

October 29, 2013 - Events Coordination During Embryogenesis
A new study by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists reveals a mechanism through which the expression of genes is controlled -- a finding that highlights genetic mutations that can impair the timing of gene expression. Such mutations can affect the co-ordination of key events that are required for stepwise development of an organism, and can also give rise to cancer by turning on genes at the wrong time.

October 24, 2013 - Hunter College and Weill Cornell Medical College Join Forces to Advance Bench-to-Bedside Medical Discoveries
Standing in the Belfer Research Building on Thursday, Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab and Weill Cornell Dean Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher celebrated an innovative partnership between the two institutions for collaborative research.

October 16, 2013 - Toxin-Emitting Bacteria Being Evaluated as a Potential Multiple Sclerosis Trigger
A research team from Weill Cornell Medical College and The Rockefeller University has identified a bacterium it believes may trigger multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic, debilitating disorder that damages myelin forming cells in the brain and spinal cord.

October 08, 2013 - Blood Vessel Cells Can Repair, Regenerate Organs, Say Weill Cornell Scientists
Damaged or diseased organs may someday be healed with an injection of blood vessel cells, eliminating the need for donated organs and transplants, according to scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College.

October 02, 2013 - NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center Celebrates Transplant Program's 50 Years of Lifesaving Success
This week NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and The Rogosin Institute celebrate the 50th anniversary of their world-renowned transplant program. To commemorate this important milestone, an anniversary celebration, "50 Years of Transplant Excellence," was held, and attended by some 200 members of the leadership and staff of NewYork-Presbyterian, Weill Cornell Medical College, and The Rogosin Institute; transplant recipients, donors, and family members; and partners from the community.

October 01, 2013 - Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc. Launched by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, The Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical College, and Partnership Formed with Takeda
New powerhouse for therapeutic research founded with $20 million in generous support from Lewis Sanders and Howard Milstein.

September 26, 2013 - Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Names New Director
NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center has appointed Dr. Felice Schnoll-Sussman director of its Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health.

September 25, 2013 - Neuroscientist Sheila Nirenberg Wins MacArthur "Genius" Award
Neuroscientist Dr. Sheila Nirenberg was named a 2013 MacArthur Foundation "genius." The award carries a $625,000 unrestricted grant.

September 19, 2013 - Researchers Tease Apart Workings of a Common Gene
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have discovered why a tiny alteration in a brain gene, found in 20 percent of the population, contributes to the risk for anxiety, depression and memory loss.

September 18, 2013 - NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Receives Transformative Gift from The Mortimer D. Sackler Foundation
NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center has received a transformative gift from The Mortimer D. Sackler Foundation to create the Sackler Brain and Spine Institute in support of neurological and neurosurgical patient care and innovative medical research and education. The gift was announced at an inauguration celebration yesterday.

September 17, 2013 - Birth Setting Study Signals Significant Risks in Planned Home Birth
While the number of homebirths in the United States has grown over the last decade, researchers at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center have found that babies born at home are roughly 10 times as likely to be stillborn and almost four times as likely to have neonatal seizures or serious neurologic dysfunction when compared to babies born in hospitals

September 13, 2013 - Weill Cornell Medical College Announces New Dean of Graduate School of Medical Sciences
One of the world's leading immunologists, Dr. Gary Koretzky, has been named dean of the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences and senior associate dean for research at Weill Cornell Medical College, effective Oct. 1.

September 10, 2013 - Weill Cornell Medical College Receives $100 Million Gift from Joan and Sanford I. Weill and the Weill Family Foundation to Launch New Capital Campaign
Weill Cornell Medical College announced today that it has received a $100 million gift from longtime benefactors Joan and Sanford I. Weill and the Weill Family Foundation to launch the Medical College's $300 million Driving Discoveries, Changing Lives campaign dedicated to using the most advanced scientific approaches to rapidly translate research breakthroughs into innovative treatments and therapies for patients.

August 16, 2013 - Pretreating Aggressive Lymphoma with Targeted Therapy Improves Chemotherapy Effectiveness
Patients with an aggressive lymphoma that often relapses and kills within two years experienced a remission of their cancer and stayed disease-free as long as 28 months after taking a commercially-available drug that made chemotherapy more effective.

August 05, 2013 - The Doctor Will Email You Now
Patients like it and so do health organizations, but electronic communications in clinical care will likely not be widely adopted by primary care physicians unless physician workloads are reduced or they are paid for the time they spend phoning and emailing patients, both during and after office hours.

August 01, 2013 - Advance in Regenerative Medicine Could Make Reprogrammed Cells Safer While Improving Their Function
The enormous promise of regenerative medicine is matched by equally enormous challenges. But a new finding by a team of researchers led by Weill Cornell Medical College has the potential to improve both the safety and performance of reprogrammed cells.

August 01, 2013 - Novel Drug Shuts Down Master Protein Key to Lymphoma
Researchers have discovered how an experimental drug is capable of completely eradicating human lymphoma in mice after just five doses. The study, led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College, sets the stage for testing the drug in clinical trials of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, itself the seventh most frequently diagnosed cancer in the U.S.

August 01, 2013 - Interview with the Dean: Fighting for Genetic Liberty
Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher speaks with Dr. Christopher Mason, an assistant professor of physiology and biophysics and assistant professor of computational genomics. Dr. Mason recently celebrated a victory, testifying before the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of genetic liberty.

July 16, 2013 - Weill Cornell Presents Updated Results from Phase 3 Trial of IVIG for Alzheimer's Disease
Weill Cornell Medical College neurologist Dr. Norman Relkin reported new findings today from the Phase 3 clinical trial of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulin) in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Boston, Mass. While the primary study outcomes were negative, observations from the subgroup analyses include whether there may be a dose-dependent reduction of beta amyloid in the blood and brain of IVIG-treated Alzheimer's patients who have the ApoE4 genotype.

July 16, 2013 - Even Healthy-Looking Smokers Have Early Cell Damage Which Destroys Necessary Genetic Programming
Smokers who've received a clean bill of health from their doctor may believe cigarettes haven't harmed their lungs. However, researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have found that even smokers who seem healthy have damaged airway cells, with characteristics similar to cells found in aggressive lung cancer.

July 03, 2013 - Urine Biomarker Test Can Diagnose as well as Predict Rejection of Transplanted Kidneys
A breakthrough non-invasive test can detect whether transplanted kidneys are in the process of being rejected, as well as identify patients at risk for rejection weeks to months before they show symptoms, according to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

June 25, 2013 - Hypertension-Driven Disease Rapidly Rising in Sub-Saharan Africa
Based on the experience of a large hospital in Tanzania, Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have discovered a "startlingly" high burden of hypertension in this sub-Saharan African country.

June 20, 2013 - Interview with the Dean: From Iraq to NYC: A Personal Journey
Dr. Laurie Glimcher speaks with Dr. Mohamed Al-Kazaz, a recent graduate of Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar and a resident in internal medicine at Weill Cornell and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

June 20, 2013 - Stress from 9/11 Linked to Nationwide Resurgence in Smoking Among Americans Who Had Quit
The 9/11 attacks on America appear to have caused about one million former smokers across the country to take up the habit again and maintain it, according to a Weill Cornell Medical College public health study.

June 18, 2013 - Tackling a Framework for Surgical Innovation
An international team of investigators co-led by Weill Cornell Medical College is offering a new framework for evidence-based surgery and device research, similar to the kind of risk and benefit analysis used in evidence-based medicine.

June 13, 2013 - Epigenetic Factor Likely Plays a Key Role in Fueling Most Common Childhood Cancer
Changes in an epigenetic mechanism that turns expression of genes on and off may be as important as genetic alterations in causing pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College and published in the June 10 online edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

June 10, 2013 - Center for Autism and the Developing Brain Set to Open at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, along with its affiliated medical schools, Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, today celebrated the dedication of its new Center for Autism and the Developing Brain, located at the hospital's Westchester campus in White Plains. Developed in collaboration with New York Collaborates for Autism, the 11,000-square-foot facility will provide comprehensive services to people with autism spectrum disorders at every stage of life, from infancy through adulthood.

June 07, 2013 - Scientists, Biotech Industry and Investors Join Forces in Second Annual Brain Tumor Biotech Summit at Weill Cornell Medical College
The nation's leading brain tumor and biotech industry experts again joined forces Friday, June 7, in a bid to accelerate more effective treatments for brain tumors and promote funding for the latest emerging therapies, as the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center and Voices Against Brain Cancer hosted its second annual Brain Tumor Biotech Summit.

June 06, 2013 - Researchers Discover How Brain Circuits Can Become Miswired During Development
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have uncovered a mechanism that guides the exquisite wiring of neural circuits in a developing brain -- gaining unprecedented insight into the faulty circuits that may lead to brain disorders ranging from autism to mental retardation.

May 22, 2013 - Researchers Find Common Childhood Asthma Unconnected to Allergens or Inflammation
Little is known about why asthma develops, how it constricts the airway or why response to treatments varies between patients. Now, a team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College, Columbia University Medical Center and SUNY Downstate Medical Center has revealed the roots of a common type of childhood asthma, showing that it is very different from other asthma cases.

May 22, 2013 - Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher Honored by Female Scientists from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research for Excellence in Immunology Research
Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher, the Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College and provost for medical affairs of Cornell University, is the winner of a prestigious award from a group of female scientists from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research dedicated to celebrating outstanding women in science and medicine.

May 16, 2013 - Weill Cornell's Dr. John P. Leonard Leads National Cancer Institute's Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Lymphoma Committee
Dr. John Leonard, an internationally-recognized hematology and oncology expert specializing in the treatment of lymphomas at Weill Cornell Medical College, has been named chair of the Lymphoma Committee for the prestigious National Cancer Institute-sponsored group, the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Leonard is the associate dean for clinical research at Weill Cornell and director of the Joint Clinical Trials Office at Weill Cornell and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

May 13, 2013 - Researchers Discover Master Regulator That Drives Majority of Lymphoma
A soon-to-be-tested class of drug inhibitors were predicted to help a limited number of patients with B-cell lymphomas with mutations affecting the EZH2 protein. However, a research team, led by investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College, now report that these agents may, in fact, help a much broader cross section of lymphoma patients.

May 10, 2013 - Cocaine Vaccine Passes Key Testing Hurdle
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have successfully tested their novel anti-cocaine vaccine in primates, bringing them closer to launching human clinical trials.

May 09, 2013 - Dr. Augustine M. K. Choi Appointed Chairman of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and Physician-in-Chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
Dr. Augustine M. K. Choi has been appointed chairman of the Department of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and physician-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, effective Aug. 1, 2013. Dr. Choi currently is the Parker B. Francis Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

May 08, 2013 - NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Announces Dedication of W. P. Carey Emergency Unit
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital celebrated the dedication of the W. P. Carey Emergency Unit at a ceremony held on Thursday, May 2, 2013. Made possible by a $5 million gift from the W. P. Carey Foundation, the facility is a critical component of the hospital's emergency services.

May 02, 2013 - Interview with the Dean: Healing Haiti
Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher speaks with Dr. Dan Fitzgerald, associate professor of medicine and co-director of the Weill Cornell Center for Global Health. Dr. Fitzgerald works primarily in Haiti, providing medical care to people in one of the poorest places in the Western Hemisphere.

May 01, 2013 - Regional Anesthesia Technique Significantly Improves Outcomes of Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery
A highly underutilized anesthesia technique called neuraxial anesthesia, also known as spinal or epidural anesthesia, improves outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill Cornell Medical College. The study, which appears in the May issue of the journal Anesthesiology, found that neuraxial anesthesia, a type of regional anesthesia, reduced morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay and costs when compared with general anesthesia.

April 30, 2013 - How Some Cancers "Poison the Soil" to Block Metastasis
Cancer spread or metastasis can strike unprecedented fear in the minds of cancer patients. The "seed and the soil" hypothesis proposed by Stephen Paget in 1889 is now widely accepted to explain how cancer cells (seeds) are able to generate fertile soil (the microenvironment) in distant organs that promotes cancer's spread. However, this concept does not explain why some tumors do not spread or metastasize.

April 30, 2013 - Weill Cornell Reaches $1.3 Billion Goal for its Pioneering Discoveries that Make a Difference Campaign
Weill Cornell Medical College has reached its goal of raising $1.3 billion, completing the highly ambitious Discoveries that Make a Difference Campaign. This campaign was thought to be the largest fundraising effort ever undertaken by a medical school when it was launched in October 2006, as part of Cornell University's comprehensive capital campaign -- which recently reached the $4 billion milestone.

April 25, 2013 - Periodic Bursts of Genetic Mutations Drive Prostate Cancer
Cancer is typically thought to develop after genes gradually mutate over time, finally overwhelming the ability of a cell to control growth. But a new closer look at genomes in prostate cancer by an international team of researchers reveals that, in fact, genetic mutations occur in abrupt, periodic bursts, causing complex, large scale reshuffling of DNA driving the development of prostate cancer.

April 23, 2013 - Drug Therapy Offers High Cure Rate for Two Hepatitis C Subtypes
A new drug is offering dramatic cure rates for hepatitis C patients with two subtypes of the infection -- genotype 2 and 3, say a team of scientists led by Weill Cornell Medical College researchers. These two subtypes account for approximately 25 percent of hepatitis C infection in the United States.

April 08, 2013 - New Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute Established at Weill Cornell Medical College
Weill Cornell Medical College has established the new Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, a unique, multidisciplinary translational neuroscience research hub. Named in honor of long-time benefactors Gertrude and Louis Feil, the institute was created with a generous $28 million gift from the Feil Family.

March 28, 2013 - FOR MEN ONLY! From Heart Rate to the Prostate, the Iris Cantor Men's Health Center Offers One-Stop Shopping for Health Care
Attention men! Now it's your turn to have a center specially designed to meet your health care needs. The first of its kind in the region, the Iris Cantor Men's Health Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center is a bright, open and high-tech environment where internists and urologists provide men with full-service health care, from heart rate to the prostate. The center offers men the same kind of comprehensive care the Iris Cantor Women's Health Center has provided to women since it opened a decade ago.

March 26, 2013 - Dr. Hugh Hemmings Appointed Chairman of Anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medical College and Anesthesiologist-in-Chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
Dr. Hugh C. Hemmings Jr. has been appointed chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medical College and anesthesiologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Dr. Hemmings currently serves as vice chair for research in the Department of Anesthesiology, the Distinguished Research Professor in Anesthetic Mechanisms, professor of anesthesiology and of pharmacology and attending anesthesiologist.

March 25, 2013 - You Don't "Own" Your Own Genes
Humans don't "own" their own genes, the cellular chemicals that define who they are and what diseases they might be at risk for. Through more than 40,000 patents on DNA molecules, companies have essentially claimed the entire human genome for profit, report two researchers who analyzed the patents on human DNA. Their study, published March 25 in the journal Genome Medicine, raises an alarm about the loss of individual "genomic liberty."

March 25, 2013 - Researchers Decode Biology of Blood and Iron Disorders Mapping Out Novel Future Therapies
Two studies led by investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College shed light on the molecular biology of three blood disorders, leading to novel strategies to treat these diseases.

March 21, 2013 - Health Care Quality Measurement for Doctors' Offices Needs Improvement
In its 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm, the Institute of Medicine outlined six domains of quality in medical care: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency and equity. But, Dr. Tara Bishop writes in a new viewpoint article published online March 21, in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), current quality measures for the outpatient setting do not include all of these domains. As a result, quality measurement and quality improvement efforts in the outpatient setting have neglected critical areas of high quality care.

March 21, 2013 - New Method Developed to Expand Blood Stem Cells for Bone Marrow Transplant
More than 50,000 stem cell transplants are performed each year worldwide. A research team led by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators may have solved a major issue of expanding adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) outside the human body for clinical use in bone marrow transplantation -- a critical step towards producing a large supply of blood stem cells needed to restore a healthy blood system.

March 20, 2013 - Metal Stents Are Effective Treatment for Blocked Bile Ducts
A multi-center analysis, led by Weill Cornell Medical College and published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, shows the use of temporary "fully covered self-expanding metal stents" (FCSEMS) can effectively fix a painful and potentially life-threatening benign biliary stricture — a severely blocked or narrowed bile duct.

March 19, 2013 - Are Accountable Care Organizations "Improving Population Health"?
Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), a key feature of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), aim to control health care costs, enhance quality in health care and improve population health. But what does "improving population health" really mean? This is the question asked in a new viewpoint article by Weill Cornell Medical College researchers published in the March 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The authors argue a clear definition is crucial in order to formulate effective health care and social service policy.

March 18, 2013 - In Qatar, Diabetes is High Risk Factor for Heart Attack and Stroke
Diabetes tops the list of preventable conditions and risk factors associated with heart attack and stroke in Qatar, according to a study appearing in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Local and Global Health Perspectives.

March 18, 2013 - Healthy Eating App Launched By WCMC-Q and Vodafone
Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar's (WCMC-Q) health campaign Sahtak Awalan: Your Health First has launched a new mobile phone app that helps users maintain a healthy diet and encourages them to exercise as well. The app is called Your Health First: Calorie Counter.

March 12, 2013 - Weill Cornell Medical College Opens New Comprehensive Medical Practice on Manhattan's West Side
Weill Cornell Medical College and its faculty practice, the Weill Cornell Physician Organization, today celebrated the opening of a new medical practice at 2315 Broadway at West 84th Street. The comprehensive practice expands access to Weill Cornell's world-class physicians on Manhattan's West Side and offers imaging, primary care and the most in-demand specialty services to children and adults — all under one roof.

March 11, 2013 - U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, U.S. Rep. Chris Gibson, Tick-Borne Disease Alliance and Weill Cornell Medical College Host NYC Forum on Silent Epidemic of Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases
Today, U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and U.S. Rep. Chris Gibson (R-N.Y.), in partnership with the Tick-Borne Disease Alliance (TBDA), a national nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness and promoting advocacy to find a cure for Lyme and other tick-borne diseases, hosted a forum at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City to discuss the fight against the silent epidemic of tick-borne diseases, including Lyme disease. A satellite forum was held at SUNY Ulster, and the event was streamed live at tbdalliance.org and weill.cornell.edu/tickborne/.

March 07, 2013 - NIH Awards Nearly $2 Million to NYC Institutions to Close the Scientific Gap in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research
Weill Cornell Medical College has been awarded more than $1.9 million by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to lead an innovative research study using advanced neuroimaging and clinical evaluations of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The new four-year clinical study, to be conducted in collaboration with Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Beth Israel Medical Center, will aim to expand the scientific understanding of CFS, improve diagnostics for the condition and discover novel biomarkers, all of which may lead to the identification of new and more effective treatment targets.

March 06, 2013 - Helping Those Seeking Asylum in the United States: Weill Cornell Center for Human Rights Creates New Forum to Connect Activists, Professionals & Students
Approximately 400,000 foreign-born survivors of persecution and torture live in the United States, struggling to receive asylum. Addressing the complex challenges faced by these asylum seekers requires collaboration and resource-sharing across the human rights community. With that goal in mind, the Weill Cornell Center for Human Rights (WCCHR) will host the first annual New York Asylum Network Luncheon from 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. Saturday, March 9 at Weill Cornell Medical College's Weill Greenberg Center, 1305 York Ave. This innovative forum will bring together activists, professionals and students to develop vital solutions to the common challenges faced by persons seeking asylum in the U.S.

March 04, 2013 - Researchers Discover How to Shutdown Cancer's Powerful Master Protein
The powerful master regulatory transcription factor called Bcl6 is key to the survival of a majority of aggressive lymphomas, which arise from the B-cells of the immune system. The protein has long been considered too complex to target with a drug since it is also crucial to the healthy functioning of many immune cells in the body, not just B cells gone bad.

February 26, 2013 - Researchers Solve the 3D Crystal Structure of One of the Most Important Human Proteins
A research team at Weill Cornell Medical College has solved the 3D crystal structure of a member protein in one of the most important classes of human proteins -- the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These types of proteins latch on to and transmit chemical signals from outside the cell to the inside, and half of all drugs on the market today work by ether inhibiting or activating GPCRs.

February 25, 2013 - Why Snoring in Kids Isn't Cute
Sleep-related problems are among the most common issues seen by a pediatrician, and for good reason -- poor sleep habits can lead to behavioral, educational, social and health problems. Fortunately for parents, many childhood sleep problems can be recognized early and treated successfully.

February 21, 2013 - UAlbany and Weill Cornell Researchers Discuss Broad Impact of HIV-Testing Guideline Changes in New England Journal of Medicine
University at Albany and Weill Cornell Medical College researchers discuss proposed changes in HIV-Testing guidelines by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in a perspective article in the March 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Authors Erika G. Martin, assistant professor of public administration and policy at UAlbany's Rockefeller College and fellow at the Rockefeller Institute of Government, and Dr. Bruce R. Schackman, associate professor of public health and chief of the Division of Health Policy at Weill Cornell, address the broad impact the changes will have on the health care of HIV-infected patients.

February 21, 2013 - Dr. Lewis Cantley Awarded $3 Million Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for Excellence in Cancer Research
Dr. Lewis Cantley, a leading cancer researcher credited with discovering a family of enzymes fundamental to understanding cancer, was named a winner of the inaugural Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, the world's richest academic prize for medicine and biology. The prize, which carries a $3 million cash award, recognizes excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and human life.

February 21, 2013 - Connections for Cardiovascular Health Announces $181,895 Grant to Weill Cornell Medical College
The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation Connections for Cardiovascular Health program today announced a grant of $181,895 to Weill Cornell Medical College in support of the Weill Cornell Heart-to-Heart Community Outreach Campaign.

February 20, 2013 - New Bioengineered Ears Look and Act Like the Real Thing
Physicians at Weill Cornell Medical College and biomedical engineers at Cornell University have succeeded in building a facsimile of a living human ear that looks and acts like a natural ear. Researchers believe their bioengineering method will finally succeed in the long quest by scientists and physicians to provide normal looking "new" ears to thousands of children born with a congenital ear deformity.

February 20, 2013 - Interview with the Dean: Precision Medicine
Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher, dean of Weill Cornell Medical College, speaks with Dr. Mark Rubin, a renowned researcher who has just been appointed director of the newly established Institute for Precision Medicine. Dr. Rubin uses genome sequencing to tailor individualized treatment for cancer patients. He says the Institute for Precision Medicine could potentially give hope to cancer patients who have failed traditional therapies, as well as look into little known cancers.

February 19, 2013 - Pioneer in Neural Development Honored With the Mortimer D. Sackler, M.D. Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Developmental Psychobiology
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Weill Cornell Medical College have announced that the Mortimer D. Sackler, M.D. Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Developmental Psychobiology has been awarded to Carla Shatz, PhD, the Sapp Family Provostial Professor in Neurobiology at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Shatz's work has advanced understanding of fundamental principles of early brain development with the discovery that neuronal activity prior to birth is essential for later formation and refinement of connections in the visual system. Her work has important implications for understanding how the visual system refines its connections—work that has contributed to our understanding of critical periods of brain wiring in developmental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

February 13, 2013 - Copper Depletion Therapy Keeps High-Risk Triple-Negative Breast Cancer at Bay
An anti-copper drug compound that disables the ability of bone marrow cells from setting up a "home" in organs to receive and nurture migrating cancer tumor cells has shown surprising benefit in one of the most difficult-to-treat forms of cancer — high-risk triple-negative breast cancer.

February 04, 2013 - Damaged Blood Vessels Loaded with Amyloid Worsen Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease
A team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered that amyloid peptides are harmful to the blood vessels that supply the brain with blood in Alzheimer's disease — thus accelerating cognitive decline by limiting oxygen-rich blood and nutrients. In their animal studies, the investigators reveal how amyloid-? accumulates in blood vessels and how such accumulation and damage might be ultimately prevented.

February 04, 2013 - Reaching the Goal of $1.3 Billion, Weill Cornell Completes Its Highly Ambitious Discoveries that Make a Difference Campaign
On Friday, Feb. 1, Sanford I. Weill, chairman of the Board of Overseers of Weill Cornell Medical College, announced that the school had reached its goal of raising $1.3 billion, thus completing the highly ambitious [I]Discoveries that Make a Difference Campaign[/I]. The announcement was made at the Medical College in the presence of Cornell University's Board of Trustees, including Chairman Robert Harrison and President Dr. David Skorton, along with the Weill Cornell Medical College Board of Overseers.

February 01, 2013 - $5 Million Awarded in Sixth Starr Cancer Consortium Grant Competition
Cancer research teams from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, The Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical College, the New York City based members of the Starr Cancer Consortium (SCC), are winners of $5 million in grant awards from The Starr Foundation's Sixth Starr Cancer Consortium Grant Competition to fund five novel cancer research projects.

January 30, 2013 - New Institute for Precision Medicine Created at Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
Recognizing that medicine is not "one size fits all," Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital have created the pioneering Institute for Precision Medicine at Weill Cornell and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. This new, cutting-edge translational medicine research hub will explore the new frontier of precision medicine, offering optimal targeted, individualized treatment based on each patient's genetic profile. The institute's new genomic research discoveries will help develop novel, personalized medical therapies to be tested in innovative clinical trials, while also building a comprehensive biobank to improve research and patient care.

January 30, 2013 - Erectile Dysfunction Drug Also Helps Men Ejaculate and Orgasm
New data suggests the erectile dysfunction (ED) drug Cialis may also be beneficial in helping men who have problems with ejaculation and orgasm, report researchers from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in the February issue of the British Journal of Urology International. Cialis is currently approved for the treatment of ED, benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) and for treatment of men with both conditions.

January 24, 2013 - Interview with the Dean: Redefining Cutting-Edge
Dean Laurie Glimcher speaks with Dr. Ash Tewari, the Ronald P. Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology at Weill Cornell and director of the LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery who is now the founding director of the new Center for Prostate Cancer.

January 24, 2013 - Science Needs a Second Opinion: Researchers Find Flaws in Study of Patients in "Vegetative State"
A team of researchers led by Weill Cornell Medical College is calling into question the published statistics, methods and findings of a highly publicized research study that claimed bedside electroencephalography (EEG) identified evidence of awareness in three patients diagnosed to be in a vegetative state.

January 22, 2013 - Black Patients with Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure Are Not Being Prescribed Beneficial, Inexpensive Diuretic Drug
A research study of more than 600 black patients with uncontrolled hypertension found that less than half were prescribed a diuretic drug with proven benefit that costs just pennies a day, report researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Visiting Nurse Service of New York's (VNSNY) Center for Home Care Policy and Research. The researchers say these new findings should be taken as a serious wake-up call for physicians who treat black patients with hypertension.

January 15, 2013 - Researchers Identify Ways to Improve Quality of Care Measurement from Electronic Health Records
Health care providers and hospitals are being offered up to $27 billion in federal financial incentives to use electronic health records (EHRs) in ways that demonstrably improve the quality of care. The incentives are based, in part, on the ability to electronically report clinical quality measures. By 2014, providers nationwide will be expected to document and report care electronically, and by 2015, they will face financial penalties if they don't meaningfully use EHRs.

January 14, 2013 - Researchers Reveal Aggressive Breast Cancer's Metastatic Path
Scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College have discovered the molecular switch that allows aggressive triple negative breast cancer cells to grow the amoeba-like protrusions they need to crawl away from a primary tumor and metastasize throughout the body. Their findings, published in Cancer Cell, suggest a novel approach for developing agents to treat cancer once it has spread.

January 14, 2013 - Generic HIV Treatment Strategy Could Save Nearly $1 Billion Annually but May Be Less Effective
Replacing the combination of brand-name, antiretroviral drugs currently recommended for control of HIV infection with soon-to-be-available generic medications could save the U.S. health care system almost $1 billion a year but may diminish the effectiveness of HIV treatment. A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Weill Cornell Medical College investigators, appearing in the January 15 Annals of Internal Medicine, examines the potential impact of such a change.

January 10, 2013 - The Tres Cantos Open Lab Foundation and Weill Cornell Medical College Join Forces on Tuberculosis Drug Discovery
Despite major advances in high-throughput screening and genomic technologies, tuberculosis (TB) drug development remains hindered by a general inability to measure the effective penetration of chemical compounds into Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria (Mtb) which cause TB. To address this gap, the Tres Cantos Open Lab Foundation has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College funding to support a visiting Weill Cornell microbiologist's two-year research project at the Tres Cantos Open Lab in Spain to measure and analyze the permeability of chemical compounds into Mtb using novel metabolomics technology.

January 07, 2013 - Dr. Ash Tewari to Lead New Center for Prostate Cancer at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College have established the Center for Prostate Cancer at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, a comprehensive center dedicated to research into and the treatment of prostate cancer.

January 07, 2013 - Electronic Health Records with Technical Assistance Can Improve Patient Care in New York City
The relationship between a physician practice's adoption of electronic health records (EHR) and quality improvements in patient care remains unclear. However, a new study published in the January issue of Health Affairs by Weill Cornell Medical College and the Primary Care Information Project (PCIP) of the New York City Health Department shows evidence that EHR implementation can improve patient care in small physician practices in New York City when combined with sustained high-intensity technical assistance.

January 04, 2013 - Gene Therapy Reprograms Scar Tissue in Damaged Hearts into Healthy Heart Muscle
A cocktail of three specific genes can reprogram cells in the scars caused by heart attacks into functioning muscle cells, and the addition of a gene that stimulates the growth of blood vessels enhances that effect, said researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College, Baylor College of Medicine and Stony Brook University Medical Center in a report that appears online in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

January 02, 2013 - Dr. Matthew E. Fink Appointed Chairman of Neurology at Weill Cornell
Dr. Matthew E. Fink, a leader in stroke and critical care neurology, has been named chairman of the Department of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College and neurologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.